College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sciences is, from both historical and functional points of view, the core of the modern university. The College of Arts and Sciences views creativity, inquiry and understanding as among the greatest values in human experience. Thus, the College of Arts and Sciences is dedicated to the questioning, creation and transmission of knowledge; to the provision of undergraduate and graduate educational programs that are responsive to the need of an enlightened and productive citizenry; and to the provision of programs and services that enhance the quality of life of the people it serves.

These goals complete a commitment to creativity and inquiry free of bias and based upon the principles of objective scholarship. The College’s goals require a responsibility to promote and convey those elements of the liberal arts and sciences that must be essential components of the educational goals of all units of the university. The college seeks richness through diversity of its programs and strength through erudition.

Degree Program
Troy Campus
Phenix
City Campus
Dothan
Campus
Montgomery Campus
Global Campus*
Troy Online
Biomedical Sciences
X
         
Computer Science
X
   
X
   
Computer Network and Security Concentration            
Artificial Intelligence Concentration            
Software Development Concentration            
Criminal Justice
X
 
X
 
X
Environmental & Biological Sciences
X
       
X
History
X
       
X
International Relations
X
 
 
X
X
Public Administration
X
     
X
X
Social Science
X
       
X
Certificate in Biomedical Sciences
X
         
Certificate in Government Contracting          
X

* Please refer to http://www.troy.edu/admissions/ for specific program availability by location


MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Troy University Master of Arts program in history is to develop broad, analytical historical knowledge in a variety of subject areas. The MA will also educate students in writing and research skills necessary to the historical profession.

Students choose from two separate tracks under the 12-course, 36-hour Master of Arts program in History. The Thesis track prepares students for further graduate study, especially Ph.D. programs in History. Under this track, students prepare and defend a substantial, original work of research using primary documents. The Non-Thesis track is a terminal degree for those students interested in furthering their knowledge of history, but not necessarily in further graduate work. The Non-Thesis track includes coursework in subject areas and research and concludes with comprehensive exams. Students may switch tracks during their coursework, with the understanding that doing so may increase the time needed to obtain their degree. In either track, the students must choose a primary field of study from the following: (1) American history; or (2) European history. In addition, students must choose a secondary field from the following: (1) American history; (2) European history; or (3) a specific thematic emphasis.

Prerequisite Requirements

Candidates for admission must have a baccalaureate degree in any subject area from a regionally accredited college or university. There are no prerequisite course requirements. Students with undergraduate degrees outside of history are encouraged to inquire about the program.

Admission Requirements

Unconditional Admission

  1. Hold a master’s or higher degree from a regionally accredited university. No test score is required. An official transcript showing completion of a master’s or higher degree is required.

    OR

  2. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 (4.0 scale) or a 3.0 grade point average on the last 30 semester hours. All hours attempted in the term in which the 30 semester hours were reached will be used to calculate the grade point average. All transcripts from all colleges or universities attended are required.

    AND

  3. Have an acceptable score on the appropriate entrance exam: GRE [294 (920 on the old exam) (verbal plus quantitative), MAT 396, GMAT 490]

Conditional Admission
Conditional admission may be granted under certain circumstances to applicants who cannot satisfy all unconditional admission requirements to a graduate program. See conditional admission requirements in the general regulations section of this Catalog.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of four courses (12 semester credit hours) taken at another regionally accredited institution, each with a "B" grade or better, can be applied toward the degree. These courses must be comparable in catalog description to Troy University courses in the MA program in History and must be approved by the Chair of the History Department. Students who transfer a "core" course will still be held accountable for all material in Troy courses. In addition, transfer non-thesis track students must still successfully complete the comprehensive exam on their primary and secondary fields. Transfer thesis track students must still complete the comprehensive examination in their secondary field.

Requirements for Admission to Candidacy

To be admitted to candidacy, students must have a 3.0 GPA on all work attempted. Students must have completed 18 hours of coursework and attained grades of A or B in each of the three required core classes. In addition, students who have more than two grades of a "C" or lower will not be eligible for candidacy.

Unconditionally admitted graduate students must apply for admission to candidacy after completing nine semester hours of requirements as outlined for the specific degree program.

If the student makes a "C" or lower in a core course, the course must be retaken. If the student makes a "D" or "F" in an elective course, the course may be retaken or another elective taken in its place.

Specific Notes Regarding Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the most serious ethical violation in the history profession. All History Masters students are expected to understand the concept of plagiarism as well as the rules of proper citation. Students caught plagiarizing in any way in any graduate history course face an automatic F in the class as well as possible expulsion from the program. For more information on plagiarism, consult the Oracle (Troy University's student handbook), as well as the graduate history website, and your advisor and professors.

Degree Options

There are two degree options: thesis track and non-thesis track. In the thesis track option, the student must successfully complete and defend a thesis as well as complete other requirements listed. In the non-thesis track option, the student must pass two written comprehensive exams as well as complete other requirements listed.

Degree Requirements

For the History MA, students must complete the following:

  1. Unconditional admission
  2. Overall 3.0 GPA in all graduate work completed
  3. No more than two grades below a “B.”
  4. Completion of all Core Courses with a “B” or better.
  5. Completion of the curriculum
  6. Successful completion of the comprehensive examinations, and/or thesis, as applicable.
  7. For thesis track students, demonstration of reading proficiency in an applicable language
  8. For thesis track students, successful defense of the thesis
  9. Admission to candidacy prior to the completion of 18 semester hours
Thesis
Three required core classes
The selection and completion of a primary field of study (either American or European history)
The selection and completion of a secondary field of study (either American, European, or a specific thematic field of history, not to duplicate the primary field)
The successful completion of a comprehensive examination in the secondary field
The successful completion of a reading proficiency language exam
The successful completion of a thesis
Non-Thesis
Three required core classes
The selection and completion of a primary field of study (either American or European history)
The selection and completion of a secondary field of study (either American, European, or a specific thematic field of history, not to duplicate the primary field)
The successful completion of comprehensive examinations in the primary and secondary fields.

Submission of Thesis

For Thesis Track students, the Thesis must be submitted according to Thesis Guidelines.

Curriculum

The Master of Arts in History is a 36-hour (12 course) degree. Students in the MA in History program may choose from one of two tracks: (1) The thesis track; or (2) the non-thesis track. In either program, students must choose a primary and secondary field for their degree. All courses offered in the degree are for 3 credit hours (a 1-hour thesis class is available for those students who have met the thesis hour requirements but have not yet had their thesis approved). Continuous enrollment is required.

The MA history curriculum is divided into two types of courses. Students must take some of each type as they move toward their degree. Readings Courses (5000-level courses) or 6000 level with “Readings” in the title cover a specific topic and provide a background of knowledge. These may be either in a discussion or lecture-based format. Research Courses (6000-level courses with “Seminar” in the title) provide an opportunity for students to complete original research in a specific area or topic of history, while solidifying knowledge of subject matter and historiography in that area. Both types of classes include significant amounts of reading and writing.

Core classes (to be taken by all students regardless of track)

All history masters’ students, regardless of track or chosen field, must first take:

  • HIS 6630 Foundations of Graduate Study in History (3 credit hours)
  • HIS 6632 American Historiography (3 credit hours)
  • HIS 6634 European Historiography (3 credit hours)

Note:Core courses do NOT count toward the primary or secondary field requirements.

Primary/Secondary Fields

In addition to these Core Classes, students must also take classes based on their specific track and primary/secondary fields. Core Classes must be successfully completed prior to taking any other classes toward the degree. Exceptions may only be made with the written permission of the student’s advisor and the Chair of the Department.

  Available Emphasis for Primary Field
  American History
  European History
   
  Available Emphasis for Secondary Field
  American History
  European History
  Specific Thematic Emphasis*

*The specific thematic emphasis must be chosen in consultation with (and approved by) both the Chair of the History Department and the student's advisor. These may be, for example (note that the following is by no means an exhaustive list): public history, gender history, history of science, environmental history, African American history, the American South. The thematic secondary field should not overlap with the student's primary field to a significant degree, and must include a historiography course and a 6000-level research course.

Thesis Track (36 Hours)

The Thesis Track is offered to students who wish to continue their graduate studies with a Ph.D. It includes the completion of a significant piece of original historical research (approximately 100 pages) dependent on primary source material.

Coursework  
Students must take:  
3 core courses 9 sh
5 courses - Primary Field
(at least 2 at 6000-level)
15 sh
2 Courses - Secondary Field
( at least 1 at 6000-level
6 sh
Thesis 6 sh
TOTAL
36 sh

Language Requirements
All thesis track students must demonstrate reading proficiency in a foreign language prior to enrolling in their thesis hours. The foreign language requirement depends upon the student’s primary field. Students should consult with their advisors for available language exams. Members of the history graduate faculty (or other qualified graduate faculty) will compose, administer, and evaluate all foreign language exams.

Students must satisfy the language requirement by successful completion of a proctored reading proficiency/translation exam, to be evaluated by members of the graduate history faculty (or other qualified graduate faculty).

This exam must be completed and passed prior to the completion of the first 18 semester hours of the program. Exceptions to this policy may be made in writing by the Chair and advisor.

Thesis Requirements
The thesis is a substantial work of original research (generally around 100 pages), based upon primary sources. Students should develop their masters topic and thesis in close consultation with their advisor and Thesis Committee. The Thesis Committee will be composed of two members of the Troy graduate faculty and one outside member, who must be able to qualify as a member of the graduate faculty. The Chair of the Department is an ex officio member of each Thesis Committee.

Thesis hours are taken only after the successful completion of all coursework and the comprehensive examinations. Online students may not register for more than 3 thesis credit hours in one term. (exceptions to this may only be granted by the Chair of the Department). Students who enroll in these hours and do not complete their thesis must re-enroll in at least one hour per semester until graduation. No other courses may be taken at the same time as the thesis hours. In addition to preparing the written thesis, the student must also successfully pass an oral defense of their thesis before their thesis committee. The thesis defense will be scheduled for the end of the semester in which the thesis hours are taken. The defense may, only in extreme circumstances, be conducted via electronic conferencing systems. Students should consult the Thesis Guidelines for additional information.

The Thesis Track is available to all History MA students, including online students.

Comprehensive Examinations
After the completion of all coursework (in the semester or term prior to taking thesis hours), Thesis Track students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination in their secondary field. Students should work closely with their advisor to prepare for their comprehensive exam, which will be prepared, administered, and evaluated by members of the graduate faculty. Comprehensive exams will be proctored and written.. Comprehensive exams will be taken as scheduled by the university and/or department during the last semester/term of coursework prior to taking the exam.

Non-Thesis Track (36 hours)

The Non-Thesis Track is designed for those students wishing to broaden their expertise in certain areas of history. The Non-Thesis track is considered a terminal degree. Students who believe they might be interested in further graduate study (a Ph.D.) should take the Thesis Track.

Coursework  
Students must take:  
3 core courses 9 sh
5 courses - Primary Field
(at least 2 at 6000-level)
15 sh
3 Courses - Secondary Field
( at least 1 at 6000-level)
9 sh
1 course - Elective
(6000 level)
3 sh
TOTAL
36 sh

Language Requirements
There are no language requirements for the Non-Thesis Track.

Comprehensive Examinations
After the completion of all coursework (in the semester or term prior to graduation), Non-Thesis Track students must successfully complete comprehensive examinations in both their primary and secondary fields. Students should work closely with their advisor to prepare for their comprehensive exams, which will be prepared, administered, and evaluated by the student's advisor and graduate committee. Comprehensive exams in the primary and secondary fields will be proctored and written. Comprehensive exams will be taken as scheduled by the university and/or department during the last semester/term of coursework.

Courses

Required Core Courses
HIS 6630 3 Foundations of Graduate Study in History
HIS 6632 3 American Historiography
HIS 6634 3 European Historiography
     
Readings Classes
     
American History
HIS 5504 3 Military History of the United States
HIS 5505 3 Old South
HIS 5506 3 New South
HIS 5511 3 Colonial America
HIS 5512 3 The American Revolution and the New Nation
HIS 5513 3 Sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction
HIS 5514 3 Gilded Age and Progressive Era
HIS 5515 3 Contemporary America
HIS 5517 3 Jacksonian America
HIS 5520 3 The Vietnam War
HIS 5521 3 African American History
HIS 5522 3 History of American Women
HIS 5523 3 Civil Rights Movement
HIS 5530 3 US Diplomatic History
HIS 5537 3 Interwar and World War II America
HIS 5540 3 History of American Minorities
HIS 5541 3 American Constitutional Development
HIS 5548 3 The West in American History
HIS 5550 3 Environmental History of the U.S.
     
European History
HIS 5501 3 French Revolution and Napoleon
HIS 5502 3 Europe from 1815-1900
HIS 5503 3 Contemporary Europe
HIS 5509 3 England to 1688
HIS 5510 3 England Since 1688
HIS 5533 3 Modern Russia
HIS 5538 3 The Cold War
HIS 5542 3 Renaissance and Reformation
HIS 5543 3 Age of Absolutism
HIS 5544 3 Enlightenment Europe
HIS 5545 3 Modern Germany
HIS 5553 3 Late Antiquity
HIS 5564 3 The Crusades
HIS 5567 3 Medieval Europe
HIS 5574 3 Modern Eastern Europe
     
Elective Classes
HIS 5595 3

Selected Topics in History

     
Research/Seminar Classes
     
American History
HIS 6600 3 Seminar in 19th Century American History
HIS 6602 3 Seminar in 20th Century American History
HIS 6603 3 Seminar in 18th Century American History
HIS 6640 3 Seminar in 17th Century American History
HIS 6641 3 Seminar in Slavery
HIS 6642 3 Seminar in Ethnicity/Race in America
HIS 6643 3 Seminar in War and American Society
HIS 6653 3 Seminar in Gender History
     
European History
HIS 6604 3 Seminar in Modern France
HIS 6610 3 Seminar in Comparative Revolutions
HIS 6611 3 Seminar in 19th Century Europe
HIS 6612 3 Seminar in 20th Century Europe
HIS 6613 3 Seminar in British History
HIS 6660 3 Seminar in Holocaust and Genocide
HIS 6665 3 Seminar in Medieval History
HIS 6666 3 Seminar in Renaissance and Reformation Europe
HIS 6667 3 Seminar in Age of Absolutism and Enlightenment
     
Thesis Hours
HIS 6695 1-6 Thesis
     
Elective Classes
HIS 6650 3 Seminar in the History of Science
HIS 6651-52 3 Thematic Historiography
HIS 6670 3 Readings in the History of the Middle East
HIS 6671 3 Readings in Modern East Asia
HIS 6672 3 Readings in the History of Africa
HIS 6673 3 Readings in Colonial Latin America
HIS 6674 3 Readings in Modern Latin America
HIS 6675 3 Readings in the History of Mexico
HIS 6676 3 Readings in the ABC Powers
HIS 6677 3 Readings in the History of the Caribbean
HIS 6678 3 Readings in Women, Health, and History
HIS 6679 3 Readings in Infectious Disease and History
HIS 6680 3 Teaching College History
HIS 6696-97 3 Selected Topics in History

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

World politics have undergone a profound alteration over the past two decades. The collapse of the former Soviet Union, the evolution of the European Union, events in the Greater Middle East, the rising power of China as well as other developing countries, the influence of non-state actors such as terrorist groups and NGOs, plus concerns about national and global economic issues demonstrate a paradigm shift in international affairs. The Cold War, which dominated global events for nearly five decades, is over, yet what will replace the norms and institutions of that era is not clear. What is apparent, however, is that the world community is increasingly interdependent, that traditional identities and values are being reexamined, and that new challenges are likely to emerge.

The Master of Science in International Relations (MSIR) degree program is a 12-course, 36-credit-hour curriculum of study designed to provide students with the foundation and knowledge needed to understand the context and conduct of international relations. Students are encouraged to gain a wide-ranging appreciation of the political, historical, cultural, economic, and geographical factors that affect international relations. This appreciation is accomplished through a program of instruction focused on international relations theory and its application but drawing from disciplines such as history, economics, and geography. Students also acquire methodological and analytical skills that improve their understanding and ability to evaluate national and global developments.

The program offers courses covering history, regional studies, comparative government, foreign policy, the global economy, geography, conflict management, national security, global climate change, international organization, international law, intercultural relations, and the politics of developing countries.

Prerequisite Requirements

Candidates for admission must have a baccalaureate degree in any subject area from a regionally accredited college or university. There are no prerequisite course requirements.

Students with undergraduate degrees in areas not included in the curriculum are encouraged to inquire about the program.

Graduates of the Master of Science in International Relations program include individuals with undergraduate degrees in the social sciences as well as in such areas as English, foreign language, engineering, chemistry, mathematics, psychology, education, and business administration.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science in International Relations Degree

Unconditional Admission

  1. Hold a master’s or higher degree from a regionally accredited university. No test score is required. An official transcript showing completion of a master’s or higher degree is required.

    OR

  2. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 (4.0 scale) or a 3.0 grade point average on the last 30 semester hours. All hours attempted in the term in which the 30 semester hours were reached will be used to calculate the grade point average. All transcripts from all colleges or universities attended are required.

    AND

  3. Have an acceptable score on the appropriate entrance exam [GRE 294 (920 on the old exam) (verbal plus quantitative), MAT 396, GMAT 490].

Conditional Admission

Conditional admission may be granted under certain circumstances to applicants who cannot satisfy all unconditional admission requirements to a graduate program. See conditional admission requirements in the General Regulations section of this Catalog.

Accelerated BS/MSIR Admission

Certain qualified honors students who successfully complete the Troy Political Science International Relations Concentration-Accelerated Honors Option will be allowed to transfer up to 9 hours of MSIR graduate credit earned during their last year of undergraduate studies to the Graduate MSIR Program. Refer to the most recently published Undergraduate Catalog for more information about admission to the BS/MSIR Accelerated Honors Option.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of four courses (12 semester credit hours) taken at another regionally accredited institution, each with a “B” or better grade, can be applied toward the degree; graduate-level courses completed by U.S. service personnel in Professional Military Education programs may also qualify for transfer credit. These courses must be comparable in catalog description to Troy University courses in the MSIR program and must be recommended for transfer credit by the Chair of the Department of Political Science and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

Degree Requirements

  1. Unconditional admission
  2. Overall 3.0 GPA
  3. Completion of the curriculum listed below. If the student makes a “D” or “F” in a core course, the course must be retaken. If the student makes a “D” or “F” in an elective course, the course may either be retaken or another elective taken in its place.
  4. Successful completion of the comprehensive examination or a thesis*
  5. Successful completion (“B” or better) of IR 6601 Research Methods in International Relations, the program research requirement

    *The thesis option is not available to Troy Online students.

Curriculum

All courses offer three semester hours credit.

The MSIR curriculum of study consists of three integral components.

  1. Four core required courses
  2. The selection and completion of one program concentration
  3. The successful completion of a comprehensive examination OR the preparation and defense of a Master’s Thesis
Non-Thesis Option
Core Courses 12  
Concentration Courses 24  
Total
36  
     
Thesis Option
Core Courses 12  
Concentration Courses 18  
Thesis Hours 6  
Total
36  

Required Core Courses (12 sh)
All MSIR students must take these four courses:

IR 5551 3 Survey of International Relations
IR 6601 3 Research Methods in International Relations
IR 6620 3 International Political Economy
IR 6652 3 Theory and Ideology of International Relations

MSIR Concentration Options :
Students must choose ONE of the following concentrations:

  • Global Studies (24 sh)
  • National Security Affairs (24 sh)
  • Regional Affairs (24 sh)

Global Studies Concentration (24 sh)
Students may choose any eight of the following courses:

HIS 5503 3 Contemporary Europe
HIS 5504 3 Military History of the United States
IR 5502 3 International Political Geography
IR 5524 3 Contemporary American Foreign Policy
IR 5533 3 Comparative Government
IR 5540 3 Conflict Processes
IR 5541 3 Middle Eastern Security
IR 5542 3 Diplomacy
IR 5543 3 Middle Eastern Political Economy
IR 5544 3 European Political Economy and the European Union
IR 5552 3 International Law
IR 6600 3 Selected Topics in International Relations
IR 6602 3 Geostrategic Studies
IR 6610 3 International Organizations
IR 6612 3 Comparative Public Policy
IR 6616 3 East Asian Security
IR 6621 3 East Asian Political Economy
IR 6622 3 European Security
IR 6623 3 Arab-Israeli Conflict
IR 6624 3 Geopolitics of Eurasia
IR 6625, 6626, 6627 3 Specialized Study in International Relations
IR 6631 3 Intercultural Relations
IR 6634 3 Tradition, Revolution, and Change
IR 6635 3 National Security Policy
IR 6640 3 Government and Politics of Developing Nations
IR 6641 3 Comparative Politics of Latin America
IR 6642 3 Comparative Politics of Russia and Eastern Europe
IR 6644 3 Comparative Politics of the Middle East
IR 6645 3 Comparative Politics of East Asia
IR 6646 3 Comparative Politics of South Asia
IR 6647 3 Comparative Politics of Western Europe
IR 6648 3 Comparative Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
IR 6650 3 Environmental Security, Conflict, and Development
IR 6655 3 International Conflict Management
IR 6656 3 International Power and Influence
IR 6660 3 Military Strategy and International Relations
IR 6665 3 Readings in International Relations
IR 6668 3 Thesis
IR 6669 3 Thesis
IR 6681 3 Tribalism and Colonialism in Africa
IR 6685 3 Terrorism and Political Violence
IR 6686 3 Latin American Security
IR 6687 3 Latin American Political Economy
IR 6688 3 Political Islam
PA 6610 3 Foundations of Public Administration
PA 6622 3 Public Policy
     
National Security Affairs Concentration (24 sh)
Students must choose any four of the following courses: (12 sh)
HIS 5504 3 Military History of the United States
IR 5524 3 Contemporary American Foreign Policy
IR 5540 3 Conflict Processes
IR 5541 3 Middle Eastern Security
IR 5552 3 International Law
IR 6600 3 Selected Topics in International Relations
IR 6602 3 Geostrategic Studies
IR 6616 3 East Asian Security
IR 6622 3 European Security
IR 6623 3 Arab-Israeli Conflict
IR 6624 3 Geopolitics of Eurasia
IR 6635 3 National Security Policy
IR 6650 3 Environmental Security, Conflict, and Development
IR 6655 3 International Conflict Management
IR 6656 3 International Power and Influence
IR 6660 3 Military Strategy and International Relations
IR 6685 3 Terrorism and Political Violence
IR 6686 3 Latin American Security
     
Approved Elective Courses: (12 sh)
     
Students must choose four courses from the remaining electives listed for the Global Studies Concentration.
     
Regional Affairs Concentration (24 sh)
Students must take 9 hours from the following courses: (9sh)
IR 5502 3 International Political Geography
IR 5533 3 Comparative Government
IR 5542 3 Diplomacy
IR 5552 3 International Law
IR 6610 3 International Organizations
IR 6612 3 Comparative Public Policy
IR 6631 3 Intercultural Relations
     
Concentration Relevant Electives Courses:(9 sh)
Students must choose three courses from one of the following regional groups:
     
Middle East and North Africa
Students must take at least one course focused on Africa and one focused on the Middle East
IR 5541 3 Middle Eastern Security
IR 5543 3 Middle Eastern Political Economy
IR 6616 3 East Asian Security
IR 6623 3 Arab-Israeli Conflict
IR 6624 3 Geopolitics of Eurasia
IR 6640 3 Government and Politics of Developing Nations
IR 6644 3 Comparative Politics of the Middle East
IR 6648 3 Comparative Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
IR 6681 3 Tribalism and Colonialism in Africa
IR 6685 3 Terrorism and Political Violence
IR 6688 3 Political Islam
     
Asia
IR 6616 3 East Asian Security
IR 6621 3 East Asian Political Economy
IR 6624 3 Geopolitics of Eurasia
IR 6640 3 Government and Politics of Developing Nations
IR 6645 3 Comparative Politics of East Asia
IR 6646 3 Comparative Politics of South Asia
     
Europe    
HIS 5503 3 Contemporary Europe
IR 5544 3 European Political Economy and the European Union
IR 6622 3 European Security
IR 6624 3 Geopolitics of Eurasia
IR 6642 3 Comparative Politics of Russia and Eastern Europe
IR 6647 3 Comparative Politics of Western Europe
     
Latin America
IR 6640 3 Government and Politics of Developing Nations
IR 6641 3 Comparative Politics of Latin America
IR 6686 3 Latin American Security
IR 6687 3 Latin American Political Economy
     

Approved Electives Courses: (6 sh)

Students must choose two courses from the remaining electives listed for the Global Studies Concentration.

The third component of the MSIR degree program is the successful completion of ONE of the following options:

  1. Comprehensive Examination –Students choosing this option must successfully complete a six-hour comprehensive examination, typically after all course work is completed or during the last term that they are registered for course work. Comprehensive examinations are given each term. Examination questions are developed by the MSIR faculty and approved by the Chair. Students must pass by successfully demonstrating the ability to integrate and synthesize information obtained from the course work. The comprehensive examination is graded by a minimum of two full-time and selected part-time MSIR faculty, reviewed by the Chair, and certified by the Graduate Dean. Troy University faculty and staff administer comprehensive examinations.
  2. Thesis *—Students choosing the thesis option must register for IR 6668 (3 credit hours) and IR 6669 (3 credit hours) as their last two courses in the program. They must successfully research, write, and defend their thesis while taking IR 6668 and IR 6669. This process involves directed research in selected areas of international relations, based on the student’s proposal, related to the student’s needs, with the advice and approval of a thesis adviser and a faculty reader, and culminating in a substantive research paper of appropriate depth and scholarship. Students will receive a Pass or Fail for the two thesis courses, no letter grade. Students completing this option are not required to take the Comprehensive Examination.

* The thesis option is not available to Troy Online students. Divisional Chair approval is required prior to enrolling for the thesis option. Students must obtain faculty support for their thesis prior to seeking such approval.

Note: Program changes from the Comprehensive Examination Option to the Thesis Option are not permitted after attempting the Comprehensive Examination.

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

Mission Statement
The mission of Troy University’s Master of Public Administration program is to strengthen the quality of public service by facilitating learning, promoting scholarship, improving practice, and engaging in public service. The program strives to develop graduates who bring to the public work force the intellectual acuity, ethical commitment and professional competence to effectively serve the public interest.

The MPA degree is a 12-course, 36 credit hour curriculum of study. Students may take courses as pre-service, in-service, full-time, and part-time students and through Troy Online. The MPA degree program is offered at the Global Campus site in Atlanta, through online courses, and at the Troy campus. Students with less than one year of work experience in a paraprofessional, professional, technical, or supervisory position that involves relevant service to the profession and/or public service will complete an additional three-hour internship course for a total of 39 credit hours or students may substitute the PA 6694 internship course for one (1) elective concentration course resulting in a total of 36 credit hours to complete the degree requirements. However, the student’s internship must be approved by the PA 6694 instructor in advance and performed in an area that is related to the student’s identified concentration.

Accreditation

The Troy University Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree is accredited by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA).

Admission Requirements for Master of Public Administration

To apply for admission to the Master of Public Administration program, applicants must submit the following material to the relevant Troy University address specified in the Graduate Catalog’s General Regulations section under “Pre Admission Procedures Application Forms”:

  1. Competed Application for Admission to the Graduate School;
  2. Official transcript(s) from all universities or colleges attended;
  3. Official copy of one of the following test scores: GRE, MAT or GMAT;
  4. A letter of recommendation from former professors or other appropriate professionals that addresses the applicant’s potential for success in professional graduate studies and public service;
  5. A 500 word personal statement that addresses the applicant’s professional goals, readiness for graduate studies, and potential for completing the MPA program; and,
  6. A resume listing professional experience, certifications, and other preparation for graduate studies. Eligibility for an internship waiver is initially determined by clear evidence in the personal statement an/or resume the applicant has more than one year work experience in a paraprofessional, professional, technical, or supervisory position in relevant service to the profession and/or public service.

Applicants with a master’s or higher degree from a regionally accredited university are exempt from submitting test scores. MPA Applicants are not permitted to register for MPA course prior to acceptance into the program.

Students enrolled in other accredited universities who wish to take Troy University MPA courses may use the Transient Admission Procedures specified in the General Regulations section of this Catalog.

Unconditional Admission
Applicants may be admitted unconditionally if they meet the following requirements:

  1. Applicants who have completed a master’s or higher degree from a regionally accredited college or university or equivalent foreign university.

    OR

  2. Attained a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university, or equivalent foreign university, and achieved a minimum grade point average of 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) in all undergraduate courses or a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last thirty undergraduate semester hours;

    and

  3. Have an acceptable score on the appropriate entrance exam: GRE 294 (920 on the old exam) (verbal plus quantitative), MAT 400, or GMAT 490.

The MPA admissions review process considers the complete packet of materials in determining acceptance into the program.

Conditional Admission
Upon recommendation by the MPA Admissions Committee and approval by the Director of the MPA Program, conditional admission may be granted under certain circumstances to applicants who do not satisfy all unconditional admission requirements. See also conditional admission requirements in the General Regulations section of this Catalog.

Readmission of MPA Students in Good Standing
Students who have not been enrolled for three or more years in the MPA program must complete a Readmission to Graduate School Application and meet degree requirements as stated in the most current catalog upon readmission. Students will be readmitted to the most current catalog at the time of readmission.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of 12 credit hours taken at another regionally accredited university with a grade of “B” or better can be applied to the MPA degree. Transfer credit for MPA core courses is limited to courses completed at Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA) accredited MPA programs. These courses must be comparable in catalog description to courses in the MPA program and recommended by the Director of the MPA Program and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. Professional Military Education (PME) courses and programs will not be accepted as transfer credits for Public Administration core courses but may be accepted as transfer credit for elective courses.

Internship Requirements

Students with less than one year work experience in a paraprofessional, professional, technical, or supervisory position that involves relevant service to the profession and/or public service are required to complete PA 6694 Internship. Students may substitute the PA 6694 Internship course for one (1) elective concentration course. However, the student’s internship must be approved by the PA 6694 instructor in advance and performed in an area that is related to the student’s identified concentration.

Research Requirement

For Initial Master’s Degree
All graduate programs require certification of the student’s ability to do research in a specialization. For the MPA program, this requirement is met by achieving a grade of “B” or better in PA 6601. Students must repeat PA 6601 if a grade of “C” or below is attained.

For Second Master’s Degree
If the research requirement was completed for the first master’s degree with a “B” or above, students are exempt from this requirement in the MPA program. Students exercising this exemption must complete an additional elective course in their program, or obtain approved transfer credit to achieve the minimum required credits for graduation.

Degree Requirements

  1. Unconditional Admission
  2. Overall 3.0 GPA
  3. Successful completion of PA 6699, Capstone in Public Administration, with a grade of “B” or better
  4. Completion of MPA Degree curriculum. If the student makes a “D” or “F” in a core course, the course must be retaken. If the student makes a “D” or “F” in an elective course, the course may either be retaken or another elective taken in its place.

Curriculum

The MPA degree curriculum consists of 12 courses including nine core courses and three elective courses from one concentration. It is strongly recommended that students complete PA 6601-Research Methods in Public Administration and PA 6610-Foundation of Public Administration within their initial 18 hours in the MPA program.

Required Core Courses (27 SH)

PA 6601 3 Research Methods in Public Administration
PA 6610 3 Foundations of Public Administration
PA 6620 3 Theory of Organizations
    OR
PA 6646 3 Organizational Behavior
PA 6622 3 Public Policy
PA 6624 3 Public Human Resource Management
PA 6650 3 Governmental Budgeting and Financial Management
PA 6674 3 Ethics in Public Administration
PA 6699 3 Capstone in Public Administration
PA 6603 3 Economics for Public Management
    OR
PA 6631 3 Program Evaluation
     
*Students in Nonprofit Management concentration must take PA 6631. PA 6601 must be completed prior to taking PA 6631.

Concentrations (9 hours)
Students must select one of the following concentrations and take three courses from that concentration:
  • Government Contracting
  • Justice Administration
  • National Security Affairs
  • Nonprofit Management
  • Public Health Administration
  • Public Human Resource Management
  • Public Management

Concentrations

Government Contracting
PA 6645 3 Managing Government Contracts
PA 6647 3 Advanced Contract Administration
PA 6648 3 Contract Negotiation
PA 6649 3 Government Contract Law
PA 6668 3 Grant Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations
     
Justice Administration
CJ 6620 3 Current Trends in Criminal Law
CJ 6622 3 Seminar in the Administration of Justice
CJ 6624 3 Court Administration
CJ 6630 3 Juvenile Justice
CJ 6652 3 Seminar in Corrections
     
National Security Affairs
IR 5524 3 Contemporary American Foreign Policy
IR 5551 3 Survey of International Relations
IR 5552 3 International Law
IR 6602 3 Geostrategic Studies
IR 6630 3 Seminar in International Relations
IR 6635 3 National Security Policy
IR 6656 3 International Power and Influence
IR 6660 3 Military Strategy and International Relations
     
Nonprofit Management*
PA 6607 3 Performance Measurement and Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations
PA 6630 3 Strategic Planning
PA 6631 3 Program Evaluation*
PA 6666 3 Foundations of Nonprofit Organizations
PA 6667 3 Executive Leadership in Nonprofit Organizations
PA 6668 3 Grant Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations
     
* Students in Nonprofit Management must take PA 6631. PA 6601 must be completed prior to taking PA 6631.
     
Public Health Administration
PA 6675 3 Public Health Services Administration and Policy
PA 6676 3 Legal and Social Issues in Public Health Administration
PA 6677 3 Public Health Preparedness and Emergency Response
PA 6678 3 Introduction to Public Health
 
Public Human Resource Management*
PA 6604 3 Workforce Planning and Staffing
PA 6605 3 Training and Development
PA 6606 3 Issues in Managing the Public Workforce
PA 6643 3 Advanced Public Human Resources Management
*Students in Public Human Resources Management must take PA 6624 prior to taking PA 6604 or PA 6643.
     
Public Management
PA 6603 3 Economics for Public Management
PA 6607 3 Performance Measurement and Management for Public and Non-profit Organizations
PA 6620 3 Theory of Organizations
PA 6630 3 Strategic Planning
PA 6631 3 Program Evaluation
PA 6640 3 Intergovernmental Relations
PA 6644 3 Administrative Law
PA 6645 3 Managing Government Contracts
PA 6646 3 Organizational Behavior
PA 6665 3 Leadership in Public Administration
PA 6668 3 Grant Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations
PA 6679 3 e-Governance
PA 66xx 3 Approved Adviser elective

Concentration Courses
PA 6625 Specialized Study in Public Administration or PA 6660 Readings in Public Administration may be utilized in any concentration with the prior approval of the Director of the MPA Program. In combination, these courses may not be used for more than six total credit hours. A course completed for one concentration cannot be used for another concentration.

Graduate Certificate in Government Contracting

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

Admission Requirements:

Applicants who want to pursue the Graduate Certificate in Government Contracting must be admitted to the Graduate School. See Graduate Admissions requirements.

Course Requirements:

The Graduate Certificate in Government Contracting requires the following four courses:

PA 6645 3 Managing Government Contracts
PA 6647 3 Advanced Contract Administration
PA 6648 3 Contract Negotiation
PA 6649 3 Government Contract Law

Admitted MPA students may qualify for the Certificate by completing the four required courses and maintaining an overall 3.0 GPA or better in order to meet certification requirement.

Other Requirements:

Students who wish to be issued a certificate must submit the following to their home campus:

  • Certification Intent
  • Copy of student transcript

MASTER OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

Mission Statement

The Master of Social Science Degree (M.S.Sc.) is an interdisciplinary program for graduate students that offers a wide variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary opportunities for advancing academic or career goals. The M.S.Sc. Degree makes the Social Science resources of Troy University available for student-centered and highly individualized programs of graduate study. Students are welcome and encouraged to choose classes from around the University that suit their research interests.

The M.S.Sc. Degree provides every student with a vibrant and collaborative intellectual community and core-course training in social science theory, analytical abilities, and methodology. After completing three core courses, students may choose additional courses from a variety of graduate offerings. Classes may be selected from any combination of the following subject areas; Anthropology, Sociology, Psychology, Economics, History, Geography, Social Science, and International Relations. Students have the option to take all of their elective courses in one area or can select courses from a variety of subjects.

Depending on needs, individualized programs will provide students with skills to:

  1. Provide services to a variety of public agencies and institutions.
  2. Teach in one or a variety of Social Science subject areas at a college or university level. Eighteen hours taken in a single subject area (as part of the 36 hour master’s degree) will provide qualifications to teach in that subject area.
  3. Teach at a high school level (with required teaching certification).
  4. Effectively communicate with individuals and groups from all backgrounds.
  5. Develop methodologies and skills to facilitate societal change.
  6. Pursue doctoral or professional school degrees.

Objectives

  1. To prepare students to fulfill a need in American Society for professionals in the area of Social Science by providing educational programs that develop each student’s problem solving skills to address issues that arise in the dynamic and evolving Social Sciences field;
  2. To develop each student’s ability to synthesize and apply knowledge of the critical theories and concepts in the field of Social Science in his/her problem solving analysis;
  3. To develop each student’s ability to identify and develop alternative solutions to problems that are confronted in Social Sciences field;
  4. To develop each student’s ability to evaluate and appropriately choose solutions to problems confronted in the Social Sciences field;
  5. To develop each student’s ability to effectively communicate the results of his/her analysis;
  6. To provide an appropriate program of graduate study for students who are interested in research in the field of Social Science and in advanced graduate study.

Prerequisite Requirements

The minimum requirement for admission to the Master of Social Sciences is a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited four year institution. Students who desire to enter this program but do not have a degree in Social Sciences or a closely related discipline may be required to meet other criteria such as additional coursework regarding undergraduate or professional preparation.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Social Science

A committee of graduate faculty in the Department of Social Sciences will evaluate and decide upon all applications to the program. To apply for admission to the Master of Social Science program, applicants must submit the following:

  1. Completed Application for Admission to the Graduate
    School;
  2. Official transcript(s) from all universities or colleges attended;
  3. Official copy of one of the following: GRE (with writing
    score), MAT, or GMAT scores; and
  4. A letter of recommendation that addresses the applicant’s
    potential for success in a Master of Social Science graduate
    program.

Unconditional Admission

Applicants may be admitted unconditionally if they meet the following requirements:

  1. Applicants who have completed a master's or higher degree from a regionally accredited college or university may be admitted unconditionally.
  2. Applicants who have attained a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university and achieved a minimum of 2.5 GPA in all undergraduate courses.
  3. Applicants must have an acceptable score on the appropriate entrance exam: GRE 850 combined (old) or 290 combined (new), MAT 385 or GMAT 380.

Conditional Admission

Conditional admission may be granted under certain circumstances to applicants who cannot satisfy all unconditional admission requirements to a graduate program. See conditional admission requirements in the general regulations section of this Catalog.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of four courses (12 semester hours) taken at another regionally accredited institution each with a grade of “B” or better can be applied toward this degree. These courses must be comparable in catalog description to Troy University courses in the Social Science Graduate Program and be approved by the department chair and college dean. If the student transfers a “core” or “required course,” (s)he is still subject to a written comprehensive exam based on the material present at Troy University.

Requirements for Admission to Candidacy

To be admitted to candidacy, students must have a 3.0 GPA on all work attempted. Unconditionally admitted graduate students must apply for admission to candidacy within the first eighteen semester hours of graduate coursework and complete any additional requirements outlined for the specific degree program. If not completed within the first eighteen hours, a hold will be placed on the students’ registration until the Degree Plan/ Admission to Candidacy process is completed.

Degree Options

There are two degree options: thesis and non-thesis. In the thesis option, the student must successfully complete and defend a thesis as well as complete other requirements stated below. See Thesis Guidelines for additional information. In the non-thesis option, the student must pass a written comprehensive exam.

Degree Requirements

Any student completing the coursework with a 3.0 GPA or better, fulfilling candidacy requirements, successfully completing either the Thesis or Comprehensive Exam will be awarded the master’s degree. If the student makes a “D” or “F” in a core course, the course must be retaken. If a student makes a “D” or “F” in an elective course, the course may be retaken or another elective taken in its place. Students must receive a “B” or better in SS 6691: Survey of Research Methods in Social Science.

Approval Process

Thesis Option

  1. Achieve unconditional admission to the program;
  2. Complete 9 SH of graduate level core courses;
  3. Complete 6 SH of thesis classes;
  4. Complete 21 SH hours of electives;
  5. Maintain a minimum overall 3.0 GPA; AND
  6. Submit an approved thesis proposal.
  7. Thesis Option is not available for Troy Online students.

Non-Thesis Option

  1. Achieve unconditional admission to the program;
  2. Complete 9 SH of graduate level core courses;
  3. Complete 27 SH of electives;
  4. Maintain a minimum overall 3.0 GPA;
  5. Students must successfully complete a Comprehensive Exam;

Submission of Thesis or Research Paper

The thesis must be submitted according to Thesis Guidelines.

Curriculum

All courses offer three semester hours credit.

Thesis Option*  
Required Core Courses 9 SH
Electives 21 SH
Thesis Course 6 SH
Total 36 SH
*Not available for Troy Online students.
 
Non-Thesis Option*  
Required Core Courses 9SH
Electives 27 SH
Total 36 SH
*Non-thesis option includes a comprehensive examination

Required Core Courses (9 SH)
SS 6690 3 Seminar in Social Sciences
SS 6691 3 Survey of Research Methods in Social Science*
SS 6698 3 Social Theory
* A grade of "B" or better is required
 
Electives (21/27 SH)
Select any 21/27 semester hours of graduate coursework* from the
following disciplines:
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science, or Sociology.
*Courses must be advisor- approved.
 
Thesis Courses
SS 6693 3 Thesis Practicum
SS 6695 3 Thesis

 

College of Arts and Sciences Degree Plans

 

Apply Now!