College of Health and Human Services

The College of Health and Human Services provides quality education for professional practice in a variety of areas associated with health and human services. The college aspires to the highest standard of educational excellence blending a professional perspective with a liberal arts and science foundation.

The College is committed to the development of students who are knowledgeable, caring, responsive and self-directed. The college aspires to produce graduates who are self-directed individuals able to meet the health and human caring needs of a diverse and complex society through change, advocacy and leadership within their communities.

The college’s School of Nursing offers graduate programs at the Master’s and Doctoral levels. Graduate programs within the School of Nursing include a Master’s of Nursing (MSN) in one of two tracks: Informatics and Family Nurse Practitioner. For the nurse who already holds a MSN degree, post master’s certificates options are offered in Family Nurse Practitioner and Nursing Informatics Specialist. The School of Nursing also offers post baccalaureate and post master entry options into the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Post baccalaureate DNP students enter the Family Nurse Practitioner track.

The College of Health and Human Service also offers through its School of Hospitality, Sport, and Tourism Management a Master of Science in Sport and Fitness Management, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Sport Management .

Degree Program Dothan Montgomery Phenix City Troy Global Campus* Troy Online
Master of Science in Nursing X^ X^ X^ X^    
Family Nurse Practitioner Track X X X X    
Nursing Informatics Track X X X X    
Doctor of Nursing Practice X^ X^ X^ X^    
Master of Science in Sport & Fitness Management
Sport Management       X   X
Coaching       X   X
Exercise Science       X    
Doctor of Philosophy in Sport Management           X
Master of Social Work X X X      
Direct Practice Concentration X X X      
Organizational Leadership and Management Concentration X          
Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate X X X X    
Nursing Informatics Certificate X X X X    

* Please refer http://www.troy.edu/admissions/ for specific program availability by location.

^ All courses are offered online in 16-week semesters.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SPORT AND FITNESS MANAGEMENT

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

The Sport and Fitness Management program is designed to provide the graduate with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to engage in the practice of management in a variety of settings. The goals and objectives of the program are guided by, but are not limited to, the criteria and guidelines set forth in the Standards for an Accredited Educational Program by the North American Society for Sport Management.

Students are provided with classroom, laboratory and clinical experiences to accomplish these objectives. Students are evaluated on their progress in meeting the above objectives throughout the program. Opportunities and evaluations are provided for actual participation in professional clinical sites including athletic, sport and club fitness, coaching facilities, rehabilitation facilities and community settings in the practice of Sport and Fitness Management.

The program aims to provide a broad-based, comprehensive curriculum, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration that prepares a sport and fitness manager practitioner to

  1. direct an individual's participation in selected clinical opportunities aimed at reinforcing and enhancing performance; facilitate learning of those skills and functions essential for productivity, thus the individual will be able to better communicate effectively with clients, subordinates and the public;
  2. provide services to improve function to prevent deficits in activities of daily living, work, play/leisure, and in the underlying performance of managing to ensure quality of services and effectiveness of the program; and
  3. function in a variety of roles including direct managing provider, consultant, case manager, educator, administrator, researcher and advocate in a variety of sport and fitness management delivery models and systems where sport and fitness management is traditionally practiced and in emerging areas of local community, state, regional, national and international arenas.

Upon successful completion of the SFM program, the student will be able to

  1. plan, develop, implement and evaluate programs of service designed to meet local community, state, regional, national and international needs;
  2. administer and manage a sport and fitness management service;
  3. articulate and apply sport and fitness management principles, intervention approaches, rationales, and expected outcomes of service;
  4. be innovators and leaders in the profession, applying sport and fitness management knowledge to the solution of complex sport and fitness managerial issues and health problems;
  5. demonstrate an attitude of inquiry and nurture the capacity for creative thinking, critical analysis and problem solving; to interpret research studies and to apply research results to sport and fitness management practice; and to contribute to the advancement and dissemination of research and knowledge in the behavioral science.

Prerequisite Requirements

Candidates for admission must hold a baccalaureate degree in sport and fitness management or related field.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science in Sport and Fitness Management

Unconditional Admission

  1. Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited four-year institution. Students with a baccalaureate degree from an unaccredited or otherwise accredited institution should see Unaccredited or Otherwise Accredited Student Admission.
  2. Applicants must achieve a score of 385 or higher on the Miller Analogies Test or a score of 286 or higher on the Graduate Record Examination (850 on the old exam) (verbal and quantitative) or 380 on the GMAT.
  3. Applicants must have an overall grade point average of 2.5 on a four-point scale.

Conditional Admission

  1. Students not satisfying the unconditional admission requirements may be conditionally admitted to the program pending satisfactory completion of the first 12 semester hours with a 3.0 grade point average. Students with a baccalaureate degree from an unaccredited or otherwise accredited institution should see Unaccredited or Otherwise Accredited Student Admission.
  2. Students not satisfying conditional admission requirements will be dropped from the program for one calendar year, after which time the student must petition for readmission.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of 12 semester hours taken at another regionally accredited institution of higher learning, with a grade of "B" or better, can be applied toward the degree. These courses must be comparable to Troy University’s courses and must be approved by the SFM graduate faculty.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the courses listed below with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or better and successful completion of the required comprehensive examination is necessary to fulfill requirements for the degree. If a student makes a “D” or “F” in a core or concentration course, the course must be retaken. If the student earns a “D” or “F” in an elective course, the course may be retaken, or another elective taken in its place. The student can satisfy the research component requirement by successfully completing SFM 6617 and SFM 6691 with a grade of “B” or better.

Curriculum

All courses offer three semester hours of credit except SFM 6625, 6626, 6627, 6680, 6681, and 6682.

Sport and Fitness Management
Minimum Total Hours: 36

Students may choose one of three concentrations:

  1. Sport Management
  2. Coaching
  3. Exercise Science

Students may choose thesis or non-thesis options in each concentration.

Required Core Courses (12 sh)
SFM 6600 3 Foundations of Sport & Fitness Management
SFM 6604 3 Statistical Analysis and Interpretation
SFM 6617 3 Research Methods I
SFM 6691 3 Research Methods II
     
Concentration Requirements (24 sh)
Select One of the Following Concentrations: Sport Management, Coaching, or Exercise Science
 
Sport Management Concentration
Non-Thesis Option
SFM Required Core 12 sh
SFM Courses 24 sh
Total
36 sh
     
Thesis Option
SFM Required Core 12 sh
SFM Courses 18 sh
Thesis I 3 sh
Thesis II 3 sh
Total
36 sh
Electives (18-24 sh)
SFM 6610 3 Physical Education, Sport & the Law
SFM 6614 3 Risk Management in Sport
SFM 6615 3 Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Sport
SFM 6616 3 Sport Finance
SFM 6618 3 Sport Economics
SFM 6624 3 Sociological Aspects of Sport
SFM 6625 3 Specialized Study in SFM/KHP
SFM 6632 3 Current Issues in Sport & Fitness Management
SFM 6633 3 Sport Consumer Behavior
SFM 6639 3 Sport Communication
SFM 6640 3 Sport Marketing
SFM 6641 3 Sport Facility and Event Management
SFM 6644 3 Human Resource Management in Sport and Physical Activity
SFM 6645 3 Revenue Generation in Sport
SFM 6672 3 Sport Psychology
SFM 6673 3 Ethics in Sport
SFM 6674 3 Entrepreneurship in Sport
SFM 6675 3 NCAA Governance, Compliance, and Institutional Control
SFM 6680 3 Practicum in SFM
SFM 6690 3 Internship in SFM
     
Coaching Concentration
Non-Thesis Option
SFM Required Core 12 sh
KHP Courses 24 sh
Total
36 sh
 
Thesis Option
SFM Required Core 12 sh
KHP Courses 18 sh
Thesis I 3 sh
Thesis II 3 sh
Total
36 sh
 
KHP 6602 3 Motor Skills & Human Performance
KHP 6620 3 Physical Fitness: A Critical Analysis
KHP 6650 3 Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
KHP 6670 3 Exercise Physiology
KHP 6672 3 Sport Psychology
SFM 6675 3 NCAA Governance, Compliance, and Institutional Control
Select one:
KHP 6690 3 Internship
Advisor Approved Elective
  OR  
KHP 6694 3 Thesis I
KHP 6695 3 Thesis II
     
Exercise Science Concentration
Non-Thesis Option
SFM Required Core 12 sh
KHP Courses 24 sh
Total
36 sh
 
Thesis Option
SFM Required Core 12 sh
KHP Courses 18 sh
Thesis I 3 sh
Thesis II 3 sh
Total
36 sh
 
KHP 6602 3 Motor Skills & Human Performance
KHP 6620 3 Physical Fitness: A Critical Analysis
KHP 6623 3 Biomechanics of Sport Techniques
KHP 6650 3 Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
KHP 6670 3 Exercise Physiology
KHP 6671 3 Advanced Exercise Science
Select one:
KHP 6690 3 Internship
Advisor Approved Elective
  OR  
KHP 6694 3 Thesis I
KHP 6695 3 Thesis II

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PH.D.) IN SPORT MANAGEMENT

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

Purpose

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Sport Management is a terminal degree focusing on student comprehension and interpretation of contemporary, theoretical and applied studies within the field of Sport Management. The mission of the program is to prepare the graduate with a broad range of sport management-related positions to include, but not limited to higher education, research, professional or amateur athletics, and professional sport industry.

Expected Program Outcomes

The program aims to provide a comprehensive curriculum with an area of specialization to prepare a sport manager practitioner or academician to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to conduct research related to the sport industry.
  2. Analyze, evaluate, and implement solutions to complex sport issues, to prepare innovators and leaders in the field of sport management.
  3. Support the dissemination of scholarly and practical research and knowledge in the behavioral sciences.
  4. Demonstrate teaching and research skills needed for success in professional sport management roles.

Expected Student Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Ph.D. in Sport Management the graduate will be able to:

  1. Recall knowledge from core and specialized areas of study in the curriculum.
  2. Identify essential teaching strategies necessary for success in the sport management education environment.
  3. Effectively express complex concepts both orally and in writing.
  4. Interpret research studies and apply research results to sport management practices.
  5. Apply sport management knowledge to the solution of complex sport management issues, with demonstration of sensitivity to crucial, controversial sport issues.
  6. Analyze and apply sport management principles, approaches, rationales, and expected outcomes of service.
  7. Organize and plan programs of service designed to meet local, state, regional, national, and/or international needs.
  8. Prepare research within the field of sport management for presentations and purposes.

Admissions

The applicant must submit an application to the Troy University Graduate School. No prerequisites will be required for admission other than the applicant must have attained a Master’s degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education. In order to be given full consideration, all requested materials must be received by the deadlines listed below:

Application Deadlines (Preferred Application Dates):
Fall Admission for U.S. citizens: May 1
Fall Admission for non U.S. citizens: March 1
Spring Admission for U.S. citizens: September 1
Spring Admission for non U.S. citizens: July 1

Admission Examination Requirements

  1. TOEFL scores are required for all international students; this requirement is waived if the student has earned a bachelor’s or master’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. Students scoring 80 or higher on the Internet-based TOEFL Test, 213 or higher on the Computer-based Test, and a 550 or higher on the Paper-based TOEFL Test will be given full consideration for admission into the Doctoral Program. Students scoring below these requirements may be required to (in addition to other admission requirements) interview with the Doctoral Admissions Committee prior to full consideration of admission into the program.
  2. Official scores from nationally standardized aptitude examinations, such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller’s Analogy Test (MAT), General Management Admissions Test (GMAT), or Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) must be submitted at the time of application. All entrance exams must have taken place within 5 years of submission to the program. Applicants achieving the minimum scores on the submitted entrance exam will be given full consideration for admission into the Doctoral Program. Minimum scores are presented below.
    MAT = 399 total score
    GMAT = 540 total score (verbal and quantitative)
    LSAT = 157-158 total score
    GRE = 304 [Revised GRE (verbal and quantitative only)] OR 1000 or higher [non-revised GRE (verbal and quantitative score only)]
  3. Students scoring slightly below the minimum scores indicated may request an interview with the Doctoral Admissions Committee prior to full consideration of admission into the program. If the Doctoral Admissions committee deems the applicants transcripts, references, writing sample, and statement of intent submitted items acceptable, the interview may be conducted. It is the applicants’ responsibility to contact the Doctoral Program Coordinator to request an interview.

The applicant must submit the following materials to the Troy University Graduate School:

  1. Troy University Graduate School Application Form
  2. One official transcript per each institution of higher education ever attended.
  3. Three (3) Letters of Reference
    The letters of reference must address the applicant’s readiness to enroll in a doctoral program. It is recommended that such individuals be previous undergraduate or graduate professors, advisors or others who can substantiate the applicant’s academic preparation for admittance to a doctoral program.
  4. Statement of Intent.
    1. The applicant must contact a TROY Sport Management doctoral directive faculty member(s) to inquire about the faculty member’s willingness to consider serving as the applicant’s potential major and research advisor. When contacting a doctoral directive faculty member(s), the applicant should explain how his or her research interest relates to the doctoral directive faculty member’s established research areas. The identification of more than one doctoral directive faculty member who has been contacted and expressed interest in being the potential major and research advisor is allowed. A list of doctoral directive faculty members and their curriculum vitae indicating their research areas may be viewed at http://trojan.troy.edu/healthandhumanservices/hstm/facultystaff.html.

      NOTE: The initial willingness of the identified doctoral directive faculty member should NOT be taken as a formal decision to accept the applicant as an advisee nor as a formal acceptance into the program. The final acceptance decision will be dependent on whether: 10 the applicant is approved to be accepted into the program by the doctoral admissions committee AND 2) the doctoral directive faculty member formally accepts the applicant as an advisee.

    2. The applicant must provide an extensive rationale for pursuing a Ph.D. in Sport Management as well as future career goals in the discipline.

  5. Writing Sample
    The goal of the writing sample is to measure the applicant’s ability to write clearly and succinctly in an academic fashion. The writing sample will assist the Doctoral Admissions Committee in evaluating the applicant's research, writing, analytical and problem-solving skills. The writing sample may include a thesis completed by the student or a significant research paper, preferably written at the graduate level, and solely by the applicant. The paper must be double spaced, 12 point, Times New Roman font with 1 inch margins on all sides. It is recommended that the writing sample follow the American Psychological Association (APA) style. However, other writing styles, including but not limited to Chicago, Modern Language Association (MLA), AMA Manual or other accepted research writing styles, will be considered.

    The Doctoral Admissions Committee will evaluate the writing sample based on the following criteria: 1) Writing Development and Critical Thinking – ability to articulate the primary concept and inform the reader of its focus; 2) Organization and Structure - development of the topic to include fluid transitions; 3) Paragraph Development - use of transitions and language within each paragraph.; 4) Mechanics – appropriate spelling, grammar, and punctuation; and 5) Use of Writing Style – Although all classes and dissertation will employ the APA format, the Committee will review the sample for appropriate use of other acceptable academic research writing style such as cited in the previous paragraph.

    NOTE: The writing sample could also include accepted or published research that the applicant has been sole or co-author of a research project. The applicant must submit a pdf of the paper or a link as proof of publication.

  6. Resume or Curriculum Vitae

Doctoral Admissions Committee

The Doctoral Admissions Committee will be composed of all Sport Management faculty members with doctoral directive status. Once all of the application information has been received from the Graduate School, the Sport Management Doctoral Admissions Committee will review all eligible applicants. Additionally, all eligible applicants will be required to schedule a phone interview by the committee. After the committee considers all aspects of the admission process, it will make a recommendation regarding an applicant’s admission into the Ph.D. in Sport Management Program. After a decision has been made, applicants will be notified of their status.

Only those faculty members with doctoral directive status will be able to serve as a dissertation chair and will function as the applicants’ major advisor. It is important for the applicant to note that no doctoral directive faculty member will be the major advisor for more than two students per academic year. However, since there are two opportunities for admission, should students not be admitted into the program for a Fall semester, they may be considered for the following Spring semester. All applicants are strongly encouraged to read about the backgrounds and interests doctoral directive faculty members to at www.troy.edu/hstm and contact the faculty member who best represents the applicant’s research interest prior to applying to the program.

Doctoral Teaching Assistantships

Students who are fully admitted to the Doctor of Philosophy in Sport Management program may apply for a doctoral teaching assistantship offered on the Troy, Alabama campus. Consult the Director of the PhD in Sport Management program for more details.

Transfer Credit

The Ph.D. degree in Sport Management at Troy University requires a minimum of 90 credits beyond a baccalaureate degree. In order to satisfy the 90 credits past a baccalaureate degree, no more than 30 credits of a Master’s or juris doctorate (J.D.) degree from another regionally accredited institution of higher education will be recognized. As such, the student must complete a minimum of 60 credit hours in the Sport Management doctoral program at Troy University.

Conditions for Transfer Credit from another Sport Management doctoral program:

  1. Students must complete the admissions application packet as described previously
  2. A maximum of 16 credits from another Sport Management doctoral program will be allowed to transfer to the Troy University Sport Management Sport doctoral program
  3. All transfer courses must be comparable to Troy University’s graduate courses and must be approved by the admissions committee

Entrance into the Program

All students accepted into the Ph.D. in Sport Management program are required to complete a new student orientation. The new student orientation may take the form of visiting the Troy campus or via virtual orientation. Students must meet with their major advisors routinely, preferably using technology such as but not limited to Skype, WebX or BlackBoard Collaborate that permits visualization of the parties, to discuss progress towards the degree. The primary research faculty member usually assumes the role of major academic advisor and Chair of the Comprehensive Examination and Dissertation Committees. Students and their committee chairs are responsible of organizing the Comprehensive examinations as well as the dissertation proposal and defense dates.

Time to Complete Degree

Consistent with other terminal degree programs at TROY, the Sport Management doctoral student will have a maximum time for degree completion of eight years, inclusive of completing dissertation requirements. However, it is important to note that a full-time student (i.e., taking 6 credits per term) may be able to complete coursework in two (2) years. Additionally, dissertation may require 1-2 years to fully complete. As a result, students can finish the program in as little as three (3 years).

Doctoral Student Evaluation

At least once per academic year all faculty with doctoral directive status and graduate faculty teaching in the doctoral program will meet to discuss and evaluate the progress of all doctoral students in the program. This evaluation is designed to assist the doctoral student in successfully completing the program on a timely basis. The results of the evaluations will be distributed to the students by the coordinator of the doctoral program in a timely manner.

Comprehensive Examinations

Sport Management doctoral students are required to successfully complete a written and oral comprehensive examination prior to generating a dissertation proposal and subsequent research study. The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to provide the doctoral candidate the opportunity to demonstrate a degree of mastery related to the salient concepts, theories, and practices pertaining to the discipline of Sport Management. The doctoral student will be provided an opportunity to demonstrate an understanding of research methodologies, including statistical methodology.

Timeframe for the Comprehensive Examination
The comprehensive exam may be taken in the last term of class enrollment but not any later that the end of the three subsequent terms, unless extenuating circumstances arise and approved by the committee chair. For example, should students complete their final classwork during term 2, they may elect to take the comprehensive exam in term 2 but no later than the end of term 5 unless extenuating circumstances arise.

Applying for the Comprehensive Examination
Students must inform their major advisor of their intent to take Comprehensive Exam in ample time to permit the development of the examination questions and for the preparation of the student for those questions. All students must submit a Doctoral Comprehensive Exam Application and receive approval from their major advisor, who generally serves as the comprehensive exam committee chair, at least two (2) weeks before the exam is given.

Preparing for the Comprehensive Examination
The comprehensive exam is a collaborative process between the student and the comprehensive exam committee chair, with participation by other three other selected members of the comprehensive exam committee. Students will meet with their respective Comprehensive Examination Committee Chair to discuss components of the exam and resources to assist them in responding to the questions. Under no circumstances should the students be given the actual questions that are to be included on the exam. Contact by the student with other committee members is recommended. Each member, including the chair, of the examination committee will be prepare and evaluate questions within the areas of their expertise, including at least one section for research and statistics.

Taking the Comprehensive Examination
The sport management comprehensive exam will be offered in three ways: take-home only, proctored only, or combination of take-home and proctored exams. The comprehensive examination committee will determine the dates of the exam and the timeframe for the students to return their responses. Both the exam and response return dates will be provided to the student well in advance of taking the exam to minimize interference of external entities (i.e., jobs, family issues, etc…). The chair of the comprehensive examination will oversee the administration of the comprehensive exams including the distribution of the written exam to the student, collection of the responses, dissemination of the answers to the other members of the comprehensive examination committee and scheduling the oral examination.

Written Examination
Questions on the written portion of the comprehensive examination will cover and integrate material from one research class and three content classes associated to the student’s area of specialization. The student must return the exam to the committee chair by the assigned date and time. Unless the student notifies the committee chair of extenuating circumstances and such circumstances are approved by the committee, failure to do so may result in the student being terminated from the program.

Oral Examination
Once a student has completed the written portion of the comprehensive exam, an oral examination with the student’s Comprehensive Examination Committee will be scheduled. The oral examination must be conducted in such a manner (i.e. Skype, BlackBoard Collaborate or other acceptable technological means) that there is visualization between all involved parties. Performance on both the written and oral components of the exam must be acceptable to the comprehensive examination committee for the student to receive a passing grade.

Evaluating the Comprehensive Examination
The written examination will be read and evaluated by all members of the student’s comprehensive exam committee. Generally, one week after the written examination the comprehensive exam committee will meet with the student for an oral component of the exam. NOTE: each question must be scored by at least three members of the committee. Except for allowed substitutions, all members of the examination committee must be present with the student at the oral part. Performance on both the written and oral components of the exam must be acceptable to the comprehensive examination committee. At this time, the examination committee is responsible for deciding whether the student is qualified to be admitted to doctoral candidacy.

After completing the written and oral examination, the committee will score the exam in the following manner:

Pass with Distinction:
All of the committee members agree that the student responded to all parts of the examination in an outstanding manner.
Pass:
The majority of the committee members agree student responded to the majority parts of the examination in an acceptable manner. However, in case of a tie, either the Dean or Associate Dean of the College of Health and Human Services will asked to read and evaluate the exam.
Fail Retake Permitted:
At least three of the committee members agree that the student failed to respond in an acceptable manner to more than one of the sections asked and this is the first time the exam has been taken. Under such circumstances, the exam cannot be retaken until the next semester. The student will be required to be enrolled in at least one credit hour for the semester the exam will be taken for the second time. While the committee members will remain the same, the questions asked may be different. The student will not be allowed to propose a doctoral dissertation until the exam is passed. Additionally, if the committee members agree that the student failed to respond in an acceptable manner in the second exam, the student’s program will be terminated. Retaking the comprehensive final will be permitted only once.
Fail:
All of the committee members agree that the student failed to respond in an acceptable manner to more than one of the parts asked, no retake will be permitted, and the student’s program is terminated.

Reporting Results of the Comprehensive Doctoral Examination

  1. Only after the Committee reaches a decision on the results of the Comprehensive Exam should students be notified. Typically this should occur within about three weeks of the examination date.
  2. The comprehensive examination committee chair will be responsible for notifying students of the examination results in a timely manner. Other Committee members should treat all exam information in the strictest confidence.
  3. After a student successfully completes the written and oral components of the comprehensive examination, the comprehensive examination committee chair will be responsible for notifying the Troy University Dean of the School of Graduate School.

Admission to Doctoral Candidacy
Students seeking to enter Doctoral Candidacy must have:

  1. Completed all coursework with a GPA of 3.0 or higher;
  2. Passed the comprehensive exams;
  3. Received approval and finalized a doctoral dissertation committee;
  4. Passed Doctoral Dissertation Proposal

Dissertation Proposal

The members of the Dissertation Advisory Committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student has begun doctoral work, and in general, no later than the end of 18 hours or three terms into the program. The proposal is a document that formally presents the student’s written description of the projected doctoral dissertation. The dissertation advisory committee is responsible for reviewing the proposal to determine the feasibility of the project. The committee’s approval endorses the research plan and indicates the committee supports initiating or continuing the dissertation project. Generally, the proposal should be submitted to, and approved by, the Dissertation Advisory Committee as soon as the student has successfully passed their comprehensive examination but no more than three terms thereafter.

The dissertation committee for a candidate for the doctoral degree shall consist of no fewer than three but no more than four members selected from individuals with full-time Graduate Faculty status at Troy University. At least two persons (including the chairperson) must be from the School of Hospitality, Sport, and Tourism Management and one member may be selected from a different academic, yet related, discipline. If a third member cannot be located on the Troy University campus, a faculty member from another campus may be invited to serve on the dissertation committee. Such a faculty member must hold a full-time Graduate Faculty status at the home institution and must be approved by the other members of the Dissertation Committee and be acknowledged by the Dean of the Graduate School at Troy University

Writing the Dissertation
The dissertation proposal indicates the student’s commitment to the dissertation advisory committee to complete the proposed project in a reasonable timeframe, generally a year or more. The most recent edition of the American Psychological Association (APA) will the only writing style accepted in writing the dissertation. Additionally, a 12 point font Times New Roman font should be used consistently throughout the document. The student is encourages to review the dissertation guidelines on the Troy University Graduate school website for further information.

The drafts of the dissertation will only be reviewed by all members of the dissertation committee. Feedback and suggestions from the dissertation committee members should be incorporated until the draft is considered acceptable by all members of the committee. The student should anticipate review by the dissertation committee and the incorporation of feedback to consume approximately two to three weeks.

Students must be continuously enrolled for a minimum of 1 credit hour in Dissertation (SFM 8860) per term during and including the semester in which they successfully defend their dissertation. Dissertation credit hours may exceed but may not be less than the minimum of 18 term hours. For example, if students attain18 dissertation credits but do not successfully defended their dissertation, they will be required to enroll in at least one credit hour of in Dissertation (SFM 8860) until they successfully defend their dissertation. If a student fails to maintain the continuous enrollment requirement he or she may be required to undergo re-admittance into the Ph.D. program.

Dissertation Defense
The defense provides the candidate with an opportunity to address the components of the dissertation such as the introduction, importance of the study, methodology, results, and discussion/conclusion. The work must be of publishable quality using the Graduate School’s format requirements. To complete their degree, each doctoral candidate is required to prepare, present, and orally defend a dissertation that shows independent investigation. Upon completion of the dissertation, the student must successfully complete an oral defense pertaining to the dissertation research.

When the dissertation has been approved by all members of the Dissertation committee, the student with the approval of the Dissertation chair will determine the date, time, and site of the oral Dissertation defense. All members of the defense committee must receive a copy of the candidate’s dissertation at least two weeks prior to the scheduled defense. If the student does not pass the oral dissertation defense, a subsequent oral defense may be scheduled at the discretion of the Dissertation chair. Only after the student has successfully defended the dissertation will the members of the dissertation committee sign the Dissertation Acceptance Page(s). The dissertation chair will notify the Dean of the Graduate School at least one week in advance of the scheduled oral Dissertation defense. The oral Dissertation defense must occur at least four weeks before the intended date of graduation/commencement. Due to distance constraints, if the student cannot physically be on the Troy campus for the dissertation defense, the student is responsible to arrange technology such as Skype, WebX or BlackBoard Collaborate, per the dissertation committee approval, for the dissertation defense.

After Dissertation Defense
Dissertations must be written in English and must be acceptable in form and content to present to the Dissertation Committee and to the Graduate School. The work must be of publishable quality and must be in a form suitable for publication, using the Graduate Schools’ format requirements. The Dissertation must be reviewed by the Graduate School for adherence to Dissertation formatting requirements (Appendix C in the Dissertation Guidelines). The student must submit a flawless copy printed on regular paper to the Graduate School (Adams Administration Building, Room 011, Troy campus) for format review. The appropriate number of “Dissertation Acceptance Pages” and “Human and Animal Review Forms” printed on bonded paper with appropriate original signatures should be submitted along with Dissertation. The Dissertation and other required pages are to be submitted in a “10 x 13” heavy manila envelope with a copy of the title page adhered to the front of the manila envelope. The last date a fully approved Dissertation may be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School is three (3) full weeks prior to the date of graduation. THIS DEADLINE IS NOT NEGOTIABLE.

The student is responsible for checking the University academic calendar for relevant deadlines for commencement for the semester in which he or she plans to graduate (troy.edu/records/graduation/graduationinformation.html).

Plagiarism
The awarding of a university degree attests that an individual has demonstrated mastery of a significant body of knowledge and skills of substantive value to society. Any type of dishonesty in securing those credentials therefore invites serious sanctions, up to and including suspension and expulsion (see Standard of Conduct in each TROY Catalog). Examples of dishonesty include actual or attempted cheating, plagiarism*, or knowingly furnishing false information to any university employee.

*Plagiarism is defined as submitting anything for credit in one course that has already been submitted for credit in another course, or copying any part of someone else’s intellectual work – their ideas and/or words – published or unpublished, including that of other students, and portraying it as one’s own. Proper quoting, using strict APA formatting, is required.

Plagiarism is a very serious offense that Troy University does not tolerate. Evidence of plagiarism may prevent granting of a degree.

Academic Suspension

Graduate students may earn no more than six term hours of grades below ''B''. Students who earn more than six term hours of ''C'' grades or below are automatically academically suspended from the University for a period of one calendar year, at which time the student may petition the Dean of the Graduate School for readmission.

Conditionally admitted students who do not attain a 3.0 grade point average (4.0 scale) at the completion of six term hours will be academically suspended from the University for a period of one calendar year at which time the student may petition the Dean of the Graduate School for readmission.

Students who are academically suspended are prohibited from attending the Graduate School or any academic level of the University for a period of one calendar year. Any courses taken at another university during the time of academic suspension will not be accepted for credit.

Further information may be found in the Troy University catalog at www.troy.edu/catalogs/

Readmission

For any student seeking readmission into the program, he or she must meet all degree requirements current at the time of readmission. Further information regarding readmission procedures may be found in the Troy University catalog at www.troy.edu/catalogs/

Doctoral Program Completion Requirements

All students will be required to take and achieve a minimum grade of “B” in each of the following doctoral core classes:

Doctoral Core (15 sh)
SFM 8812 3 Seminar in Sport Marketing
SFM 8814 3 Seminar in Sport Finance
SFM 8816 3 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Leadership
SFM 8820 3 Seminar in Legal Aspects of Sport
SFM 8822 3 Seminar in Sport Management Pedagogy
 
Statistics Requirements (6 sh)
All students will be required to take HSTM 8810 Seminar in Applied Statistics in Sport Management
SFM 8810 3 Seminar in Applied Statistics in Sport Management (Must achieve a minimum grade of “B”)
     
The student, in consultation with the major advisor, must select a minimum of three hours of advisor approved electives of research courses.
     
Research Requirements (9 sh)
SFM 8803 3 Research Methods for Doctoral Students (Must achieve a minimum grade of “B”)
     
The student, in consultation with the major advisor, must select a minimum of six hours of advisor approved electives of research courses to include but not limited to, the following classes:
SFM 8825 3 Specialized Study in the Area of Sport Management
SFM 8826 3 Specialized Study in the Area of Sport Management
Other 3 as approved by major advisor
 
Cognate Area Requirements (12 sh)
The cognate area represents the area of specialization that the student wishes to pursue. In consultation and with approval of the major advisor, the student will select four graduate level classes to fulfill the 12 credit cognate area requirement. Cognate areas may include, but are not limited to, Sport Organization Behavior/Theory; Sport Marketing, Sport Finance, Legal Aspects of Sport, Athletic Administration, Sport Communication, or Sport Tourism.
     
Comprehensive Examination (0 sh)
Students must take and receive an acceptable evaluation from their comprehensive examination committee before they may begin the dissertation research project.
 
Dissertation Requirements (18 sh)
 
Total Hours 60 semester hours

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK

Students should consult the General Regulations section of the Graduate Catalog for additional information regarding Graduate School admission requirements, transfer credit, and other critical policies and procedures.

The Troy University Master in Social Work Program derives its mission from the University’s goal of preparing students to demonstrate competence in their chosen field and to encourage excellence in student learning. The purpose of the Master in Social Work Program is to prepare students for advanced social work practice. The Program is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life beginning with, and progressing through, the individual system and increasingly complex levels of social organization. The basic aim is to prepare the graduate with advanced social work knowledge, values, and skills to practice within the context of a diverse, multicultural, global, and technologically oriented society. Teaching, learning, and service are exercised in an atmosphere that prizes and upholds the traditions, values, and ethics of the social work profession.

Accreditation Statement

The Master in Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and program graduates will be eligible to sit for the social work examination. Social work licensure is required in the state of Alabama for those in the practice of social work.

Objectives

The Master in Social Work derives the program’s objectives in accordance with the Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy Handbook. Students will be able to:

  1. Identify as a professional social worker and conduct one-self accordingly.
    Social workers serve as representatives of the profession, its mission, and its core values. They know the profession’s history. Social workers commit themselves to the profession’s enhancement and to their own professional conduct and growth.
  2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.
    Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of the profession, its ethical standards, and relevant law.
  3. Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
    Social workers are knowledgeable about the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and reasoned discernment. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity. Critical thinking also requires the synthesis and communication of relevant information.
  4. Engage diversity and difference in practice.
    Social workers understand how diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, political ideology, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
  5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice.
    Each person, regardless of position in society, has basic human rights, such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers recognize the global interconnections of oppression and are knowledgeable about theories of justice and strategies to promote human and civil rights. Social work incorporates social justice practices in organizations, institutions, and society to ensure that these basic human rights are distributed equitably and without prejudice.
  6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.
    Social workers use practice experience to inform research, employ evidence-based interventions, evaluate their own practice, and use research findings to improve practice, policy, and social service delivery. Social workers comprehend quantitative and qualitative research and understand scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge.
  7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.
    Social workers are knowledgeable about human behavior across the life course; the range of social systems in which people live; and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being. Social workers apply theories and knowledge from the liberal arts to understand biological, social, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development.
  8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.
    Social work practitioners understand that policy affects service delivery, and they actively engage in policy practice. Social workers know the history and current structures of social policies and services; the role of policy in service delivery; and the role of practice in policy development.
  9. Respond to contexts that shape practice.
    Social workers are informed, resourceful, and proactive in responding to evolving organizational, community, and societal contexts at all levels of practice. Social workers recognize that the context of practice is dynamic, and use knowledge and skill to respond proactively
  10. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
    Professional practice involves the dynamic and interactive processes of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation at multiple levels. Social workers have the knowledge and skills to practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Practice knowledge includes: identifying, analyzing, and implementing evidence-based interventions designed to achieve client goals; using research and technological advances; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; developing, analyzing, advocating, and providing leadership for policies and services; and promoting social and economic justice.
  11. Engage in Advanced Practice.
    Synthesize and apply a broad range of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary knowledge and skills. In areas of specialization, advanced practitioners assess, intervene, and evaluate to promote human and social well-being. To do so they suit each action to the circumstances at hand, using the discrimination learned through experience and self-improvement. Advanced practice incorporates all of the core competencies augmented by knowledge and practice behaviors specific to a concentration.
  12. Engage in Field Education.
    Social workers apply the theoretical and conceptual contribution of the classroom with the practical world of the practice setting. It is a basic precept of social work education that the two interrelated components of curriculum—classroom and field—are of equal importance within the curriculum, and each contributes to the development of the requisite competencies of professional practice. Field education is systematically designed, supervised, coordinated, and evaluated based on criteria by which students demonstrate the achievement of program competencies.

Program Eligibility

All students must be admitted to Troy University Graduate School. There is not a conditional admission based on grade point average. All students holding an earned baccalaureate degree from a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting association are eligible for application to the Two Year (60) hour program. Students must have a 2.5 (4.0 scale) or a 3.0 grade point average on the last 30 semester hours taken.

Students holding a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work (BSW) from a CSWE accredited program and have a 3.0 grade point average in the last 30 semester hours of Social Work course work are eligible to apply for Advanced Standing. Advanced Standing applicants may receive a MSW upon successful completion of 30 semester hours of Concentration Curriculum. The Director of the MSW Program is responsible for determining academic eligibility for Advanced Standing Placement. The Director is also responsible for answering questions related to academic credit applied to the degree program in adherence to accreditation and policy standards.

In addition to the grade point average requirements, students must take the GRE or MAT. The GRE acceptable score is 850 combined (old) or 290 combined (new). The MAT acceptable score is 385. There is a conditional admission only because of a low test score. Students admitted conditionally only because of a low test score will be granted unconditional admission after the completion of nine (9) semester hours provided they have maintained a 3.0 grade point average on all graduate work attempted. There is not a requirement to retake
the test once the academic requirement is met.

An additional requirement of being able to complete the MSW Program is the production of a current (within 30 days) criminal background check for Foundation and Concentration Practicum. Providing the background check does not guarantee acceptance into a Practicum setting or eligibility to sit for licensure. Students applying to this program should be aware of the potential ramifications of a positive criminal background check and the potential of not being able to complete this program. Ongoing participation requires the continual development and demonstration of the highest standards of ethical, interpersonal, and professional engagement.

Program Initiation

The Master of Social Work two year program admits students each fall. Cohorts begin only in the fall semester. The program is currently offered in a combination of face-to-face and hybrid formats. Advanced Standing (one year) program admits students in the fall. Cohorts begin for Advanced Standing only in the fall and this program is offered in a combination of face-to-face and hybrid formats.

Applications may be submitted throughout the year. Acceptance notifications will be issued in October, March, and June for the next August and May cohorts.

Program Prerequisites

All applications must have an undergraduate or graduate statistics course prior to attendance. If this requirement has not been met students may take: PSY 3301, QM 2241, MTH 2210 or the Director of the MSW program approved equivalent.

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting University graduate school admissions requirements, the student must also submit the following admission requirements:

  1. Three reference letters from the following list: applicant's most recent academic adviser, department chair, dean, college instructor, most recent employer, or one personal reference chosen by the applicant. These references must attest to the applicant's potential in forming effective interpersonal relationships, aptitude for graduate study, appropriate vocational goals relevant to the program, and personal and professional self-development.
  2. A résumé that includes personal information including topics such as, but not limited to, educational and work history, personal and professional goals, professional affiliations, volunteer work, awards, articles/grant work, and references.
  3. A personal statement written in APA format (500-750 words) addressing the following: a) reason for seeking a Master in Social Work degree; b) relevant experiences which have shaped this decision; c) future expectations post-graduation.

Transfer Credit

In addition to University transfer requirements, the Masters in Social Work will only accept master’s level courses from a CSWE accredited Social Work program. The Director of the MSW program must review and approve these transfer credits.

Practicum Requirements

Students are required to complete supervised practicum course(s) in the sequence set by the program. The student must have a current (within 30 days) national criminal background check, liability insurance, and all required documentation (shots, drug screens etc.) as required by the University and practicum site prior to participation. Providing the background check does not guarantee acceptance into a Practicum setting or eligibility to sit for licensure. Students applying to this program should be aware of the potential ramifications of a positive criminal background check and the potential of not being able to complete this program.

Degree Requirements

Foundation Curriculum
The foundation curriculum allows students to develop the foundation level competencies named above. This includes a minimum of thirty (30) semester hours of required study. The foundation practicum (6 semester hours) requires a minimum of 400 contact hours in the field.

Concentration Curriculum (30 Semester Hours)

The concentration curriculum allows students to develop competencies associated with either Direct Practice (DP) or Organizational Leadership and Management (ORGM). This includes a minimum of thirty (30) credits of required study. The Concentration Practicum is 9 semester hours requiring a minimum of 510 clock hours in the field.

MSW Requirements

Two Year 60 Semester Hour Foundation Program
Foundation Courses 30 sh
Core Concentration Courses 24 sh
Electives 6 sh
Total
60 sh
 
Advanced Standing 30 Semester Hour Program
Core Concentration Courses 24 sh
Electives 6 sh
Total
30 sh
 
Two Year Program Foundation Courses (30 semester hours):
The following are required foundation courses for all students who do not hold a BSW degree from an accredited institution.
All courses are 3 semester hours.
SWK 6601 3 Social Welfare Policy and the Social Work Profession
SWK 6604 3 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I
SWK 6605 3 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II
SWK 6606 3 Direct Practice Methods with Individuals and Families
SWK 6608 3 Theory and Practice with Groups
SWK 6612 3 Theory and Practice with Communities and Organizations
SWK 6614 3 Cultural Diversity
SWK 6691 3 Foundation Research Methods*
SWK 6696 2 Foundation Practicum and Seminar I* (134 Contact Hours)
SWK 6697 2 Foundation Practicum and Seminar II* (134 Contact Hours)
SWK 6698 2 Foundation Practicum and Seminar III* (134 Contact Hours)
*A grade of “B” or better is required.
Total Foundation Curriculum: 30 semester hours
Upon successful completion of foundation courses and selection of a concentration, students may enroll in the appropriate concentration courses.

Concentration Curriculum (30 Semester Hours)

The concentration curriculum allows students to develop competencies associated with either Direct Practice (DP) or Organizational Leadership and Management (ORGM). This includes a minimum of thirty (30) credits of required study. The Concentration Practicum is 9 semester hours requiring a minimum of 510 clock hours in the field.

Direct Practice Concentration Core Requirements (24 sh)
A student choosing the Clinical Practice concentration is required to enroll in:
SWK 7701 3 Advanced Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families
SWK 7703 3 Direct Practice Evaluation*
SWK 7705 3 Assessment and Psychopathology
SWK 7707 3 Advanced Social Work Practice with Groups
SWK 7769 3 Advanced Direct Practice Senior Seminar
SWK 7796 3 Concentration Practicum I * (170 hours)
SWK 7797 3 Concentration Practicum II* (170 hours)
SWK 7798 3 Concentration Practicum III* (170 hours)
*A grade of “B” or better is required.
     
Organizational Leadership and Management Core Requirements (24 sh)
A student choosing the Organizational Leadership and Management concentration is required to enroll in:
SWK 7730 3 Organizational Leadership and Management Practice Evaluation*
SWK 7732 3 Program Design and Development
SWK 7734 3 Advanced Policy Analysis
SWK 7736 3 Organizational Leadership and Management
SWK 7738 3 Organizational Leadership and Management Senior Seminar
SWK 7796 3 Concentration Practicum I* (170 hours)
SWK 7797 3 Concentration Practicum II* (170 hours)
SWK 7798 3 Concentration Practicum III* (170 hours)
*A grade of “B” or better is required.
 
Program Electives (6 sh)
SWK 6620 3 Social Work with Women
SWK 6622 3 Crisis Intervention
SWK 7720 3 Special Topics (Social Work with Abusing and Neglecting Families)
SWK 7722 3 Social Work in Health Care Settings
SWK 7724 3 Topics in Grant Writing and Program Development
SWK 7726 3 Social Work with Military Families

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