Surveying and Geomatics Courses (GEM)

GEM 1100
Computer-Aided Drafting I (2)
  This course gives students basic skills using computer-aided drafting software in fundamental two dimensional drafting and design, and advanced techniques in three-dimensional geometric modeling.
   
GEM 1101
Computer-Aided Drafting II (2)
  This course gives students skills in surveying drafting, map components, and fundamental skills in drafting basic surveying features using computer aided software. Prerequisite: GEM 1100
   
GEM 2220
Basics of Surveying (3)
  This course provides each student an introduction to measurement theory, instrumentation, measurement systems, measurement computations, data accuracy and precision. The structure of the field of geomatics is explored. Major components of the course are survey statistics, traverse computations, coordinate systems and datums, elevations, and mapping. The use of computer-aided drawing software to produce maps and plats is required. Prerequisites: PHY 2252. Co-requisite: GEM L220.
   
GEM L220
Basics of Surveying Lab (1)
  This field laboratory provides the opportunity to use instrumentation to make the necessary measurements to produce computed products. Focuses on the use of a field book to record measurements, the analysis of field measurements, and the use of survey instrumentation. Co-requisite: GEM 2220.
   
GEM 3309
Land Survey Principles (3)
  The course includes the basic principles of land tenure and the cadaster with the major component being the study and application of survey statute and related case law. The concepts underlying the hierarchy of evidence, sequential versus simultaneous conveyances, adverse possession, riparian rights, land descriptions, and the U.S. Public Land Survey System are explored. Prerequisite: GEM 2220. Co-requisite: GEM L309.
   
GEM L309
Land Survey Principles Lab (1)
  This laboratory explores the impact of land survey law on the practice of surveying and mapping in the state of Alabama. Focuses on the practice of writing legal descriptions, the structure of the U.S. Public Land Survey System, and courthouse research.
Co-requisite: GEM 3309.
   
GEM 3310
Land Survey Practice (3)
  The issues of boundary location and retracement are central to this course. Focuses on Alabama survey history, the practice of surveying in Alabama, professional ethics, and the Standards of Practice for Surveying in Alabama. Prerequisite: GEM 3309, Co-requisite GEM L310
   
GEM L310
Land Survey Practice Lab (1)
  Students will participate in surveys of sectionalized land in Pike County. Section corners, quarter corners and other evidence will be located using GPS and traditional surveying methods. Students will also be assigned a township research project and will present the research results to the class. Co-requisite: GEM 3310
   
GEM 3330
Advanced Measurement Analysis (3)
  Survey equipment calibration, instrumentation error, topographic mapping, control leveling, instrumentation error, and the propagation of error through survey calculations. This course is the second course of a one-year study of survey fundamentals.
Prerequisite: GEM 2220, MTH 2210. Co-requisite: GEM L330.
   
GEM L330
Advanced Measurement Analysis Lab (1)
  Field laboratory experience using EDMI calibration baselines, conducting topographic mapping projects and control level loops, and testing for instrument errors. The student is introduced to the field use of data collectors. Co-requisite: GEM 3330.
   
GEM 3366
Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (3)
  Introduction to metrical photogrammetry, interpretative photogrammetry, and remote sensing. Focuses on the theory, instrumentation, and practical application of photogrammetry to the problem of mapping the earth’s surface. Remote sensing concepts, principles, sensors, and specific satellite platforms are covered in the course. Hands-on exercises are given that makes use of software to create stereo models, orthophotos, and perform image processing. Prerequisite: GEM 2220.
   
GEM 3379
Introduction to Least Squares Adjustment (3)
  The theoretical principle of error propagation and least squares adjustment theory to compute optimized solutions to geomatics problems involving redundant data. The use of mathematical scripts and least squares software to solve spatial data adjustment problems in land surveying and geomatics applications. Prerequisites: MTH 1126, GEM 3330.
   
GEM 3390
Fundamentals of Geographic Information and Analysis (3)
  This course is the first course in a one-year study of the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics of study are digital mapping, data capture, data conversion, data structures, and spatial data concepts. Hands-on exercises are included using some of the common GIS software. Prerequisites: MTH 1112, IS 2241.
   
GEM 3391
Application of Geospatial Information Science (3)
  This course provides a study of common applications of GIS. The course provides further study in database design, digital base map analysis and testing, and spatial analysis. Hands-on exercises are included using some of the common GIS applications.
Prerequisite: GEM 3390.
   
GEM 3395
Cooperative Work Experience I (1)
  The course provides students with experience working with an employer approved for the Cooperative Work Experience component of the Surveying and Geomatics Sciences Program. The student is expected to submit a written and oral report to the faculty member directing the project, detailing the work experience. Prerequisites: GEM 2220, 2.0 overall grade point average, and approval of the Geomatics Program Director.
   
GEM 4405
Route and Construction Surveying (3)
  Explores the theoretical foundations of route and construction surveying. Course topics are coordinate geometry (COGO), horizontal and vertical curve models, spirals, alignments, stationing, cross sections, areas, volumes, and route design elements.
Prerequisites: GEM 3330. Co-requisite: GEM L405.
   
GEM L405
Route and Construction Surveying Lab (1)
  This field laboratory applies the principles of route and construction surveying, the use of civil design software, and the use of data collectors for practical design and field layout. Co-requisite: GEM 4405.
   
GEM 4407
Land Development (3)
  Explores the concepts and problems associated with the design and construction of subdivisions and related infrastructure.
Prerequisites: GEM 4409. Co-requisite: GEM L407.
   
GEM L407
Land Development Lab (1)
  This computer laboratory provides the student the opportunity to design and create those drawings necessary for local government approval of the typical subdivision. Co-requisite: GEM 4407.
   
GEM 4408
Geodesy and Geodetics (3)
  Focuses on mathematical models of the earth, survey astronomy, the earth’s gravity field, and coordinate systems, and geodetic reference framework. Important skills developed in this course include coordinate and datums transformations, map projections, astronomic observation, geodetic computations, surveying network design, and geodetic control survey. Prerequisites: MTH 1125, PHY 2253.
   
GEM 4409
Hydrology (3)
  Explores several models used to compute runoff estimates based on particular rainfall events. Course topics are the hydrologic cycle, rainfall intensity, runoff models, hydrographs, storm sewer design, culvert design, open channel flows, watershed delineation, water detention and retention structures, and onsite sewage disposal systems. Prerequisite: PHY 2253. Co-requisite: GEM L409.
   
GEM L409
Hydrology Lab (1)
  Compute peak runoff estimates, and open channel designs. Computer models are explored with respect to solving and presenting peak runoff solutions. A design project involving the use of large-scale topographic maps will be assigned. Co-requisite: GEM 4409.
   
GEM 4410
Introduction to Global Positions (GPS) (3)
  Introduction to history and development of GPS and global navigation satellite systems (GNSS); GPS signals and observables; basic principles of GPS operations; GPS error analysis, GPS survey methods and procedures; and GPS data collection, processing; and GPS applications to Geomatics. Prerequisite: GEM 3379
   
GEM 4490
Geomatics Capstone (1)
  This course prepares students for the national Fundamentals of Surveying exam to cover all aspects of the exam. Prerequisite GEO 4409.
   
GEM 4493
Guided Independent Study (1-3)
  Supervised study through creative field and laboratory projects in the Surveying and Geomatics field. A written request is to be submitted to the guiding professor and Program Director at least two weeks in advance of the term in which the study is to be undertaken. This study is NOT to be used to repeat a course for which a grade of ‘D’ or below has been earned. Application forms are available in the office of University Records. For more information see index for “Independent Study and Research”.
Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0, permission of guiding professor, approval of Geomatics Program Director, Department Chair, and Dean.
   
GEM 4494
Guided Independent Study (1-3)
 

Supervised study through guided readings, creative endeavors in the Surveying and Geomatics field. A written request is to be submitted to the guiding professor and Program Director at least two weeks in advance of the term in which the study is to be undertaken. This study is NOT to be used to repeat a course for which a grade of ‘D’ or below has been earned. Application forms are available in the office of University Records. For more information see index for “Independent Study and Research”. Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0, permission of guiding professor, approval of Geomatics Program Director, Department Chair, and Dean.

   
GEM 4496
Cooperative Work Experience II (1)
  The student must be in residence at Troy University for a minimum of one semester after completion of GEM 3395 before leaving for cooperative work experience under GEM 4496. The student is expected to submit a written and oral report to the faculty member directing the project, detailing the work experience. Prerequisites: GEM 3395 and approval of the Geomatics Program Director.
   
GEM 4499
Geomatics/GIS Projects (2)
  This course offers the Geomatics/GIS student the opportunity to apply the fundamental principles and concepts learned in the study of Geomatics/GIS to a particular problem or project. The student will state the problem, design an experiment to test a hypothesis concerning the problem statement, take the measurements, array the data, analyze the data, state conclusions, and write a final report based on the analysis and conclusions. Prerequisite: GEM 4409.
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