Local students present papers at TROY Undergraduate Research Forum

Posted: Monday, 25 April 2011

DOTHAN—Several Troy University students shared their research in the fields of English, history and sociology during the College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Forum at the Dothan Campus in April.

The event gave six College of Arts and Sciences students the opportunity to present original research papers on select topics to their peers and faculty members. The forum was held as part of National Undergraduate Research Week.

Students who presented during the forum were:
David Davenport of Ozark, a senior history major who presented the paper “Winston County, Alabama during Secession and the Civil War.”
Vanessa K. Eccles of Rehobeth, a junior English major who presented “Falstaff and The Seven Deadly Sins."
Becky Johnson of Ozark/Dothan, a senior history/psychology major who presented “The United States’ Various Responses to the Armenian Genocide.”
Stacy Haverfield Amos of Ozark, a senior social science major who presented “Going Native: The Importance of Local Narratives and Truth Telling after the BP Oil Spill.”
Sarah Newman of Echo, a senior English major who presented “Milton’s Paradise Lost within Hardy’s Tess.”
Pat Harmon of Enterprise/Ft. Rucker, a senior history major who presented “George Washington and the Masonic Teachings of Justice and Fortitude.”


Faculty moderators for the event were sociology professor Dr. Jeneve Brooks and English professor Dr. Kris Ross.

Sullivan Award

Six Troy University students presented research papers during the College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Forum at the Dothan Campus in April. The presenters were, from left to right: Vanessa K. Eccles of Rehobeth, a junior English major; Pat Harmon of Enterprise/Ft. Rucker, a senior history major; Becky Johnson of Ozark/Dothan, a senior history/psychology major; Sarah Newman of Echo, a senior English major; Stacy Haverfield Amos of Ozark, a senior social science major and David Davenport of Ozark, a senior history major. The forum was held as part of National Undergraduate Research Week. (TROY photo)