Culture Activities

Culture Activities

Chinese Culture Club (Triple C)

Welcome to the Triple C activities. Triple C cultural activities are provided by the Center for International Languages & Cultures (CILC). In ten weeks, we will presenting various aspects of Chinese culture. The events are free and open to the public. The following are the activities for the  Fall Semester of 2021.

chinese traditional instrument from Troy CI exhibition hall

Time: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. CST

Location:  014 John Robert Lewis Hall, Troy University

No registration fee needed


Fall 2021 Schedule (Tea Talk)

Chinese cuisine is an important aspect of Chinese culture. It features delicacies originated from variety of regions all across China, as well as cuisines from Overseas Chinese who have settled in other countries.

troy students and facaulty and staffs making dumplings

Presenter: Dr. Iris Xu and Mr. Austin Deal
When: Thursday. Sept. 16th 6:00-7:00 pm CST

The Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese practice tea ceremony, which is a ritualized method of brewing tea (cha). The tea ceremony (Chinese: 茶道 or 茶禮 or 茶艺) is a cultural activity that involves the ceremonial preparation and presentation of tea. It is literally translated as "way of tea" in Japanese, "etiquette for tea" or "tea ritual" in Korean, and "art of tea" in Chinese.

Mooncakes are a type of Chinese savory or sweet pastry that is usually served during the Mid-Autumn Festival. Mooncakes are an iconic delicacy of the festival, which is all about lunar appreciation and Moon watching.

tea set

Presenter: Ms. Chau Bui
When: Thursday. Sept. 23rd 6:00-7:00 pm CST

Chinese calligraphy is the art of writing Chinese characters as a visual art form that combines pure visual art and literary interpretation. This form of expression has long been prominent in China, and it is held in high regard across East Asia. Along with playing stringed music, calligraphy is recognized one of the four most renowned skills and hobbies of ancient Chinese literati.

people practice caligraphy

Presenter: Ms. Pei Lyu
When: Thursday. Sept. 30th 6:00-7:00 pm CST

In Chinese culture, the Red Thread of Fate is a belief originating from Chinese mythology. It about the two people connected by the red thread are destined lovers, regardless of place, time, or circumstances.

making chinese bracelet

Presenter: Ms. Lily Luu
When: Thursday. Oct. 7th 6:00-7:00 pm CST

Chinese painting is one of the world's oldest and most longstanding artistic traditions. Painting in the traditional style is called guó huà in Chinese, which means "national painting" or "native painting," in opposition to the Western styles of art that were popular in China in the 20th century.

students enjoying doing chinese paintings

Presenter: Ms. Pei Lyu
When: Thursday. Oct. 14th 6:00-7:00 pm CST

Chinese musical instruments were traditionally grouped into eight categories known as Bā yīn .The eight categories are silk, bamboo, wood, stone, metal, clay, gourd and skin.

a boy playing drum

Presenter: TBD
When: Thursday. Oct. 21st 6:00-7:00 pm CST
Where: Triple C Webex link

The art of paper cutting in China may date back to the second century CE, since paper was invented by Cai Lun in the Eastern Han Dynasty in China. As paper became more affordable, paper-cutting became one of the most important types of Chinese folk art.

troy faculty cutting chinese paper

Presenter: Ms. Lily Luu
When: Thursday. Oct. 7th 6:00-7:00 pm CST

The Terracotta Warriors are depicted as the armies of the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor between 210-209 BCE. It is believed that the armies will protect their emperor in the afterlife. 

Terracotta warriors at troy university

Presenter: Dr. Li Fang
When: Thursday. Nov. 18th 6:00-7:00 pm CST
Where: Triple C Webex link




Spring 2021 Schedule

The Terracotta Warriors are depicted as the armies of the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor between 210-209 BCE. It is believed that the armies will protect their emperor in the afterlife. 

Terracotta warriors at troy university

Presenter: Dr. Li Fang
When: Tue. Jan. 19th 6:00-7:00 pm CST

 Chinese dumplings (Jiaozi) are commonly eaten in China and other parts of China. They one of the important dishes represents Chinese cuisine cultures and usually eaten during the Chinese New Year. 

Troy student making dumplings

Presenter: Dr. Li Fang
When: Tue. Feb. 16th 6:00-7:00 pm CST

Things you will need to make dumplings:

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 ¼ cups warm water
  • 2 cups red cabbage
  • 2 cups green onion, sliced
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 tablespoons ginger, minced
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • ½ lb ground pork
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ¾ cup mushroom, diced
  • ¾ cup carrot, dice
  • ½ lb shrimp, peeled

Red color is the representation of wealth. fame. and prosperity. Most Chinese lanterns are red which symbolize a prosperous business and a thriving life.

Chinese lanterns

Presenter: Ms. Xixi Mao
When: Tue. Feb. 23rd 6:00-7:00 pm CST

Things you will need to make paper roses:

  1. One pair of scissors
  2. Yellow color and red color construction paper
  3. Glue or double sides tape

Chinese culture is a culture of flowers. Each type of flower carries a different symbolic meaning in Chinese culture. Especially, the red color of a rose symbolizes prosperity, luck, love, and happiness. 

Making roses paper on webex

Presenter: Ms. Xixi Mao
When: Tue. Mar. 23rd 6:00-7:00 pm CST

Things you will need to make paper roses:

  1. One pair of scissors 
  2. Toilet paper 
  3. Glue or double-sided tape 
  4. Sewing thread 
  5. Green paper 
  6. Makeup/blush powder

Since ancient times, tea has been one of the most crucial and central pieces in Chinese culture. Please come join us at Triple C to discover the wonderful atmosphere of the traditional Chinese tea ceremony and learn the art and meaning of drinking tea.

Chinese scholar demonstrate the tea ceremony

Presenter: Ms. Chau Bui
When: Tue. Apr. 6th 6:00-7:00 pm CST



                               Please contact Ms. Chau Bui for more detailed information about Triple C