Troy University Observes Black History Month

Posted: Wednesday, 27 February 2008

Laylah Amatullah Barrayn

Troy University psychology major Stephanie Graves (left) and criminal justice major LaTonya Fluellen, both of Dothan, admire a portrait of Harriet Wadsworth, during a Black History Month reception on the Dothan Campus. The 19th century charcoal likeness of the Geneva County woman is part of a collection of family treasures handed down to Agnes Windsor (not pictured). The retired teacher has conducted extensive research that provides a glimpse into rural, African-American life in the Wiregrass.

Laylah Amatullah Barrayn

As part of Troy University’s Black History Month observance, Agnes Windsor (left), director of the Slocomb Heritage House Museum, discusses traditional methods of bread kneading with Dee Anna Jordan, project coordinator for the History and Social Science Club at Troy University. The wooden dough bowl pictured belonged to Windsor’s ancestors, who migrated from Pike to Geneva County in the 1880s.

Laylah Amatullah Barrayn

Agnes Windsor (left), director of the Slocomb Heritage House Museum, shows Troy University students Tiffany Williams, of New Brockton, and Katie Reynolds, of Dothan, a homestead deed signed by President Benjamin Harrison. The document granted Windsor's ancestors farm land in the settlement of Afro/Cotton Box, which is now known as Slocomb. Windsor shared the deed and other family treasures with student at Troy University, during a Black History Month reception sponsored by Phi Alpha Theta and the History and Social Science Club.

Laylah Amatullah Barrayn

This homestead deed, which bears the signature of President Benjamin Harrison, is part of a large African-American history collection preserved by Agnes Windsor, of Slocomb. Windsor's family migrated from Pike County to Geneva County in the 1880s.